Archive for the ‘International Relations’ Category:

Trump and the New Anti-Globalism

The recent U.S. election has beeen puzzling for many people. The prediction modelers clearly got it wrong, but many of the national polls had the election within the margin of error. The exit polls are showing something that has been slowly happening for years – white, uneducated, unskilled, men have turned against the Democratic party […]

The UK’s Rocky Relationship with the EU – Brexit Talk

In late October I presented a discussion of the Brexit vote for the Missouri Southern State University themed semester on the U.K.  I present an original analysis of the Wave 7 British Election Study, attempting to disentangle who voted to leave the EU and why. It is clear from the data that, like the recent […]

The Bright Side of Brexit

Brexit is Real As many interested Americans, I stayed awake through the night watching (rather reading live blogs because U.S. coverage was minimal until the vote ended – they were too focussed on Trump and Hillary bickering to notice) what was happening with the British referendum on whether to leave the European Union (EU). The […]

Interview With KGCS-TV

This month was a very interesting time for Middle Eastern politics and American Foreign Policy. The Missouri Southern State University television channel KGCS-TV interviewed Dr. Conrad Gubera and myself for their Newsmakers television program. We tackle recent issues on the Syrian diplomatic effort currently underway in the United Nations, Middle Eastern politics, and American Foreign policy. This […]

The Power of Nightmares: The Rise of the Politics of Fear

The Power of Nightmares: The Rise of the Politics of Fear I watched this documentary last night. Like most documentaries most of the information is true but framed in a way which persuades viewers to come to a certain conclusion. The documentary’s thesis (if you want to call it that) argues that for the last 60 or […]

New Graduate Student Conference on the EU and World Politics!

I am the co-adviser to the University at Buffalo’s SUNY Model European Union organization, which is a transatlantic collegiate simulation of the European Union in the US. At this year’s simulation, held at the University of Exeter in the UK, several colleagues from Buffalo State College and I decided to organize an inter-campus graduate student conference on […]

Prolonging Defeat (Wartime Elections)

Yesterday there was an interesting blog post by Phil Arena discussing how the costs of war are distributed within democracies. The idea behind distributing the costs of war is that, “By shielding the average voter from the worst of war’s ravages, which they can do through a variety of strategies, not the least of which is avoiding […]

Wartime Elections

Motivation How does war (or any highly significant policy) affect the electorate’s vote choice? Moreover, how do different signals regarding the state of the war (success or failure) help the electorate to form their belief about the incumbent’s war policy? The political science literature regarding the affect of war on elections has a long history, beginning with […]

Should Political Scientist Prescribe Public Policy?

Happy Holidays! I hope everyone is having a great holiday season and enjoying time with family and friends. Prescriptive Realism I just received the December 2011 copy of Perspectives on Politics. As I was flipping through an article immediately caught my eye: “A Realist Foreign Policy for the United States” by Rosato and Schuessler. In this piece the […]